Tina R. Armstrong

Director of Clinical Training and PhD Program Director and Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology, Department of Clinical PsychologySchool of Psychology

Contact Information
626-584-5649
Education
BA in Theater, University of California at Los Angeles
EdM in Human Development and Psychology, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA
MA in Clinical Psychology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA
MA in Theology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA
PhD in Clinical Psychology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA

Biographical Information

Tina Armstrong joined the School of Psychology faculty in July 2015 as director of clinical training and PhD program director and assistant professor of clinical psychology. Previously she was on the faculty and coordinated the Multicultural Clinical Community Psychology emphasis area at the California School of Professional Psychology’s PhD Clinical Psychology program at Alliant International University in Alhambra, California.

Armstrong founded and was the principal investigator of the Wellness and Resilience Research Lab, which conducts research that targets historically underrepresented ethnic populations from a strength-based theoretical model, in efforts to understand issues related to wellness and resilience. As a community psychologist, she has a strong commitment to bridge the gap between academia and historically underserved communities by facilitating the training and development of students. Armstrong holds that effective education does more than simply educate students—it also acts as a conduit that helps to create, sustain, and improve our communities.

A licensed clinical psychologist, Armstrong is a member of the American Psychological Association, Association of Black Psychologists, and Sisters of the Academy. She sits on the executive board of the Southern California Association of Black Psychologists, and on the conference planning committee for the Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma (IVAT). She serves as an ad-hoc reviewer for The Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma and The Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment, and Trauma.

Areas of Expertise, Research, Writing, and Teaching

Community mental health, wellness and resilience in helping professionals, women of color in academia, vicarious trauma, mentorship and emerging professionals, early childhood mental health

Publications

Journal Articles

  • Houston-Armstrong, T., & Edmonds-Biglow, K. (2014). Work-life Balance and African American Women Entrepreneurs. In Kelly, L. (Ed.), Entrepreneurial women: new management and leadership models. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger.
  • President, M., Hawkins, J., Hendrix, F., & Houston-Armstrong, T. (2013). Inspiring professional African American women to achieve and sustain work-life balance, a lesson on mentorship. Psych Discourse, 47, 11-14.
  • Vivrett, R., Hawkins, J., Serry, F., & Houston-Armstrong, T. (2012). The role of fathers in reducing community violence. The Community Connection, 3(1), 7. Alliant International University, Alhambra, CA.
  • President, M., Nguyen, N., Hendrix, F., & Houston-Armstrong, T. (2012). The role of organized religion in encouraging disclosure after trauma. The Community Connection, 3(1), 6. Alliant International University, Alhambra, CA.
  • Bharmal, N., Kennedy, D., Jones, L., Lee-Johnson, C., Morris, D., Caldwell, B., Brown, A., Houston, T., et al. (2012). Through our eyes: Photovoice project exploring young black men’s perspective on environmental factors affecting a safe, healthy transition to manhood. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 27(2), 153-159
  • Abernethy, A. D., Magat, M. M., Houston, T. R., Bjorck, J. P., Gorsuch, R. L., & Arnold, H. (2009). Religiousness and Prostate Cancer Screening in African American Men. Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, 27(3), 310-326.
  • Abernethy, A. D., Houston, T. R., Mimms, T., & Boyd-Franklin, N. (2006). Using prayer as a metaphor in psychotherapy: Applying Sue’s differential to enhance culturally competent care. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 12(1), 101-114.
  • Abernethy, A. D., Houston, T. R., Magat, M. M., Arnold, H., Gorsuch, R. L., & Bjorck, J. P. (2005). Recruiting African American men in cancer screening studies: Applying prevention and culturally-based models. Health Education and Behavior, 32(4), 441-451.
  • Houston, T. R. (2002). Moving towards a liberation Psychology: Community violence and African American Boys [Abstract]. The Annual American Academy of Religion, Toronto, Canada.
  • Magat, M. M., Abernethy, A. D., Otis, K., Houston, T. R., & Arnold, H. (2002). Fatalism among African-American men: Effects on prostate cancer screening. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 24 (Suppl), S168.
  • Abernethy, A. D., Magat, M. M., Otis, K., Houston, T. R., & Arnold, H. (2002). Intrinsic religiousness and prostate cancer screening receptivity in African-American Men. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 24 (Suppl), S174.
  • Abernethy, A. D., Otis, K., Houston, T. R., Magat, M. M., & Arnold, H. (2002). Building partnerships with churches to increase prostate cancer control. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 24 (Suppl), S226.

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Contact
(626) 584-5200
(800) 235-2222
135 N. Oakland Ave.
Pasadena, CA 91182


Admissions
admissions@fuller.edu